Lyme Cryme: How it all Went Down

“Lyme disease” was originally known as a “relapsing fever” or borreliosis, due to the taxonomy and nature of the organism that causes the disease. Spirochetes are their own phylum, and they shed their outer surface in a mechanism called blebbing. Through “antigenic variation,” or the ability to modify their outer surface proteins (Osps), the organism causes “relapsing fever” because the host immune response must constantly address the variable antigens. For this reason, it is not possible to vaccinate against borrelia.

 

These shed layers, or “blebs” are covered with Osps, referred to as OspA, OspB, etc. OspA is a toxic, fungal-type (TLR2/1 agonist) antigen that causes sepsis and subsequent post-sepsis immunosuppression in 85% of the population. This is another reason a vaccine is not possible. Examples of parallel failed fungal vaccines include tuberculosis and HIV.

CDC officers and others who were involved in the commercialization of OspA (ALDF, Mayo Clinic, Yale’s L2 Diagnostics, Corixa, Imugen, SmithKline) knew all of this during (and likely prior to) the phase I and II trials of the OspA “vaccine” patented by Yale University (5,747,294).

CDC officer Barbara Johnson owns five patents with SmithKline, the manufacturer of LYMErix. One of her patents from 1992-93 explains that there are two distinct outcomes of OspA exposure: one being an HLA-linked (genetic) hypersensitivity, or allergic, arthritic knee response (15%), and the other being the post-sepsis immunosuppression response (85%) that patients refer to as “chronic Lyme.”

Allen Steere, in 1992-93, published research in which he 1) developed fraudulent diagnostic testing that left out OspA and OspB despite those being highly immunogenic, primary diagnostic antigens; and 2) added an ELISA to be used as a “screening” test, to exclude the neurologic, or immunosuppression cases from diagnosis. This was in direct opposition to his own 1986 research which was the basis for the original,1990 case definition, and also stated that only Western blot band 41 (flagellin) was necessary to diagnose Lyme borreliosis.

In 1994 the CDC, led by Barbara Johnson, held a conference in Dearborn, Michigan, in which they changed the disease definition (“case definition”) to include ONLY the 15% arthritis cases who otherwise are not sick. The diagnostic standard was changed from one that reflected the persistence of spirochetes and their variable surface antigens (few, changing antibodies based on Steere’s 1986 report), to one that reflects only the hypersensitivity response, or the production of many antibodies, using Steere’s fraudulent ELISA. The labs that were invited to participate did not agree with the change, and reported an average accuracy rate of 15%. This “two-tier” testing protocol is still the only testing accepted by the CDC, insurance industry and medical societies, despite not meeting FDA standards for method validation (specificity, sensitivity, etc.).

Yale, in addition to owning the LYMErix (OspA “vaccine”) patent, owns the patent for the only VALID test method for diagnosing “Lyme disease” (5,618,533), a flagellin method as previously indicated by Steere as valid. They did not use their own test method to assess the outcomes of the LYMErix trials. Instead, the new, falsified Dearborn method was used, and adverse events (immunosuppression outcomes) were discarded.

Dave Persing (Mayo) owns a patent (6,045,804) for testing based on Steere’s research in which the OspA-B antigens were left out. The patent is described as a method for distinguishing OspA vaccine recipients from OspA tick bite victims. Once LYMErix was on the market, a strain of borrelia that did not have the vaccine antigens in it would have to be used. Vaccine efficacy is never assessed with the very same antigen as the vaccine antigen. Otherwise, it would not be known if the victim has the actual infection in question, or that the antibody that shows up came from the vaccine. Had LYMErix stayed on the market, this test method would have created a monopoly on Lyme disease testing in North America, with Corixa (Persing) Imugen, and L2 Diagnostics (Yale/Robert Schoen) being the only labs licensed to test for Lyme. These entities were listed with the SEC as formal partners and advertised as such. With all tick-borne disease blood samples being processed through only these three labs, they would have had sole access to whatever other tick-borne pathogens could be identified and then commercialized as additional “vaccines” and test kits.

The American Lyme Disease Foundation (ALDF), founded in 1990, is a False Claims-and-Racketeering organization, where the wealthy “sponsors” were apparently given some inside information regarding the companies that would be manufacturing the bogus recombinant vaccines and test kits. Those companies would be given some assurance against the prosecution of the testing scam necessary to pass off these bogus recombinant products. Members of the ALDF Board of Directors simultaneously owned patents for such products, sat on the CDC committee that approved Dearborn, and were members of the Infectious Diseases Society of America’s (IDSA’s) panel responsible for setting diagnostic and treatment policy for all of North America, and which is followed internationally.

ActionLyme started the national campaign to get adverse events like Lyme disease reported thru the VAERs, resulting in the 2001 FDA hearing in which Kathleen Dickson testified that OspA was immunosuppressive and never could have been a vaccine. The FDA issued an ultimatum for SmithKline to pull LYMErix from the market, or the FDA would. SmithKline was allowed to quietly discontinue LYMErix and claim that it was due to poor sales.

The downfall of LYMErix meant the ruin of the monopoly scheme, and the racketeering organization proceeded to slander and harass Ms. Dickson and others who sought to bring them to justice. Additionally, they have continuously slandered ill and disabled victims–under the pretense that Dearborn was legitimate– in an effort to conceal their crimes and paint the innocent victims as “crazy,” “hypochondriacs,” “loonies,” and “hysterical,” through published “reviews” of research, blogs, Internet news groups, social media, and manipulation of the media.

Senator Richard Blumenthal in 2006, then Attorney General of the State of Connecticut, filed an antitrust lawsuit against IDSA. The lawsuit should have contained a charge of fraud over the falsified case definition but that would have backfired against the State of Connecticut as University of CT (UConn) participated in Yale’s vaccine scam and such a claim would have made the State of CT liable for a class action lawsuit by the other 49 States and perhaps even by other countries. The State of Connecticut and Yale Assaulted Czech Children with a known fake vaccine (OspA or LYMErix) just to see how serious would be the adverse events. Blumenthal’s staff had previously advised ActionLyme to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice, and this was done in 2003. Thirteen years later, we are waiting for them to take action.

All sources are cited in the criminal charge sheets: Charge Sheets at TruthCures

Watch our video for more on what the disease is and how the CDC conspired to deny it.

LYME CRYME from TruthCures on Vimeo.